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Great Leadership Opinions and information on leadership and leadership development by Dan McCarthy

  • Leadership and Work Teams
    by noreply@blogger.com (Dan McCarthy) on December 11, 2018 at 4:47 pm

    Guest post from Simon Mac Rory:If you work in an organization today as a leader you will lead a team. 90% of what we do in an organization happens through collaborative effort, making the team the most important production unit.For two years (2016 and 2017) Deloitte’s Global Human Capital trends survey has positioned organizational redesign as the number one concern for businesses. In 2016 they termed this the ‘Rise of Teams’ and 2017 ‘The Organization of the Future – Arriving Now’. Bottom line, organizations are seeking to reconstitute themselves as a network of teams, ditching the traditional hierarchy. This makes teamwork even more crucial to overall success or failure for the organization. The rhetoric surrounding this critical aspect of work tends to indicate that organizations and senior leaders are champions of teamwork and that they have the team ‘nut’ cracked - the reality however, points to a very different scenario.  It is estimated that only 10% of teams can truly be deemed high performing, 40% are dysfunctional and detrimental to team members experience. The balance of 50% can at best be described as performing marginally and never producing more than incremental results. For me, the success and effectiveness of any team starts and ends with the leader. In my experience of working with and coaching work teams, the best, most effective teams always seem to have the best and most effective leaders.  If this premise and the figures above are accepted it would suggest that only 10% of team leaders are high performing, enabling their teams, whilst 40% of leaders are failing in their leadership tasks, whilst the remaining 50% are barely holding in there!Most of the trouble for the struggling team leader starts with the belief that teams are there to support their leader.  Nothing could be further from the truth and the converse is the needed reality – leaders are there to support their teams. This is what is referred to as the inverted hierarchy. Leaders are at the bottom of the pyramid supporting those in the team above them and not the other way around. This is a ‘get over it already’ moment. As a team leader the only means you have to success is in the success of your team. The more successful they are, the more success for you. Your job is to get all the barriers to team performance out of the way. You ensure that the team has what it needs, and you go to bat for the team always. Your job is to deliver strategy and structure for the team and it is the team that delivers output, quality and customer satisfaction. The alternative is that you as leader do everything, believe that you have all the answers and the rest of the team become your audience whilst you perform. Jack Welsh famously said “Before you are a leader, success is all about growing yourself. When you become a leader, success is all about growing others”.  Great team leaders intuitively recognize this. This means being prepared to delegate, to empower and then to coach and support as necessary. It also means that as a leader you must recognize that the team is comprised of individuals and that each has separate, unique needs and operate at differing levels of ability and confidence. Therefore, there is a need for a leader to have flexibility in leadership style to develop the most appropriate overall style for the team, adjusting it to meet the needs of individual team members. Great team leadership is about creating the confidence in your team members to follow you by anticipating their needs and ensuring that all that can be done to enable each member of the team is done - so they can deliver.An effective team leader will understand this requirement for flexibility, evaluating their performance, examining not only their leadership style but the appropriateness of that style. They must have the confidence to continually ask themselves and the team, “Is there anything I can do to improve my leadership of this team?”Sounds complicated? Not really. Adopt the inverted hierarchy and see yourself at the bottom of the pyramid supporting the team members and their performance and not the other way around.Traditional versus inverted hierarchyWith such a disposition, the management of coaching, performance, goals, communications, up- skilling, planning and evaluation becomes the natural task of the leader. This in turn will lead to a natural adoption of the appropriate style of leadership for the team and its individual team members, driving overall performance. Finding that balance for the team overall and meeting the individual needs of members is a key task of team leadership. Remember it is not the team leader’s job to do all the team tasks, rather it is to enable and support the team members to deliver.Are you leading your team with the appropriate style? If your team has any characteristics of the left-hand column you may need to change your leadership style.Teams without appropriate leadership   Teams with appropriate leadership Lack or have misplaced confidence Display confidence Constantly seek direction Are self-managing Avoid decision making Have a clear focus Are fearful of mistakes Have an appropriate sense of ownership Have tenuous loyalty at best Have loyalty to the team leader Avoid extra effort Go the extra mile when required Keep quiet about bad news Enjoy high levels of trust and openness Find it difficult to be motivated Tend to be more motivated Have a sense of “flight or fight” and the accompanying stress levels Experience high morale – will want to belong to the team Feel frustrated Feel valued as individuals and as a team Are constantly threatened by attrition Have high retention Tend to have the few carry the many Have an equitable division of labour Allow poor performers to ‘get away with it’ leading to a sense of unfairness Do not carry poor performers Are less effective and struggle to deliver success Are more effective and more successful Simon Mac Roryis a team development specialist. He works with senior leaders to help them discover that edge to become truly high performing. He founded The ODD Company www.theoddcompany.iein 2011 to deliver TDP (a cloud-based team development tool and methodology) to the international markets. Simon operates from London with a Dublin-based support office. He received his doctoral degree for his work on the application of generic frameworks in organization development and is a visiting research fellow at NBS. His new book is “Wake up and smell the coffee – the imperative of teams” http://wakeupandsmellthecoffeebookproject.com/. […]

  • New Leadership for a Changing Workforce
    by noreply@blogger.com (Dan McCarthy) on December 7, 2018 at 8:39 pm

    Guest post from Warren Wright:If you’re hiring and leading a team of freshly-minted college graduates, you may be noticing some differences in their behavior and preferences compared to previous graduates. That’s because they’re from a new generation—we are calling them Second-Wave Millennials(Second-Wavers). The fact is, they still share many of the same traits as their older counterparts (First-Wave Millennials)—raised to feel special, high achieving, tech-savvy, but Second-Wavers (born 1995 – 2004) have some distinct differences that are making managers sit up and take notice. Who Are Second-Wavers and How Did They Get That WaySecond-Wavers are mostly children of GenXers, as opposed to First-Wavers who were mostly children of Boomers. Both generations were raised with strong parental guidance and involvement in their lives. But while the Boomer parents were perfecting hovering like a helicopter, GenX parents were more likely to be the lawnmower parents who mowed down every obstacle that lay in their child’s path so a clear and clean path toward their future could be followed. Furthermore, the introduction of the iPhone in 2007 assured that over 70% of Second-Wavers were streaming and chatting from mobile devices before they reached puberty. This brought them the tools to express themselves as individuals and they were exposed to brands that marketed to them as individuals. This combination of attachment parenting, digital sophistication toward the individual, and placing more value on the importance of social and emotional learning as well as a broad cultural shift toward making a difference in people’s lives has dramatically shifted these Second-Wavers’ priorities. The Three P’s of Second-Wave LeadershipSo, how do leaders practically manage this new batch of workers in the workplace, and what do these Second-Wavers need from an employer? As a GenXer myself, I like to keep things simple and make my recommendations memorable. So, for these Second-Wavers, I’d recommend focusing on the three P’s: Personal Attention, Professional Development, and Purpose. Personal AttentionFrom Facebook pages to Twitter handles to Instagram posts, Second-Wavers have always had the tools to create and curate their own brand. Yes, like a snowflake, they are their own person—unique and special. Ironically, they are extremely collaborative, but they still require hands-on individualized attention when it comes to their career path and goals. Consulting firm PwC has a unique approach to this issue. They assign every new hire with a team of three different mentor types: An on-boarding ambassador—who gets you up to speed on how things work at the firm, a Relationship Leader—who provides direction in your career, and finally, a Career Coach, who is there to manage you in the moment—they call it managing real-time, or play-by-play. Companies would be well served by following PwC’s lead. Professional DevelopmentThis is a big one. From a very early age, Second-Wavers were conditioned to plan for their future and gaining skills has always been a priority. After all, in video games, they get badges, gold stars, and rewards for getting to the next level! They are hungry for professional development, and in fact, according to Deloitte, the #1 reason they would leave a company is because of lack of professional development.  In my experience, the development they need most is in soft skills, not hard skills. Soft skills like critical thinking, communication, and social interaction—things we older generations take for granted, are simply not taught in college or acculturated at home. 8+ hours of screen time a day has an effect on in-person interaction, and believe it or not, this is area of growth for these Second-Wavers.PurposeAfter observing focus groups of Second-Wavers, one thing really stands out: They want to know not just what to do and how to do it, but why. I like to say that ‘why’ is the new ‘what’ for Second-Wavers. This is an extremely purpose-driven generation—one that we have not seen since the GI or Greatest Generation who worked on mission-driven projects like saving the world from a fascist scourge. Research consistently shows that this generation is more mindful of the products they buy and services they use gives back to the community. Money is important to them for sure (especially with their high debt load), but mission is still #1. And not only do they want their work to make a difference to the world, they want to know how their work fits into the bigger workflow picture. For example, if they are updating a database, they want to know—where does their update go? Who uses it next? How does this contribute overall to the company’s mission? Finally, They’re Worth The InvestmentMy last point about Second-Wavers is that they bring skills to the workplaces that have been lost by older generations. From an early age, they’ve been immersed in social and emotional learning techniques that, when used properly, can really bring people together into a more effective team dynamic. But you have to give them a chance. They’re smart (best educated generation is US history), they’re techno-gurus who have solutions you have not even thought of, and they are committed and loyal… as long as you are committed and loyal to them. Part of being a great leader is adapting to change. Second-Wavers represent a new shift in behaviors and priorities, so this is a good time to press the reset button on how you lead.  Warren Wright is author of Second-Wave Millennials: Tapping the Potential of America’s Youth. He is Founder and CEO of Second Wave Learning, a talent development company that helps companies attract and retain newly-hired Millennials in the workplace. […]

  • 6 Reassuring Truths About Public Speaking
    by noreply@blogger.com (Dan McCarthy) on December 4, 2018 at 7:25 pm

    Guest post by Allison Shapira:Even if you’re not afraid of public speaking, I’m betting you still get butterflies in your stomach before you speak. As a public speaking coach for over 15 years, I’ve seen it up-close: most people get nervous before a speech, presentation, or important meeting.                                                 Yet the fact remains: whether you have a formal leadership role such as CEO or you are a young professional looking to move into leadership, public speaking skills are critical. No matter what you do, or what stage you are at in your career: you have something powerful to say, you have a right to say it, and you want to be able to say it with clarity and authority.The good news is, you can. Simply recalling these 6 reassuring truths about public speaking will help you speak with confidence and authenticity, no matter your title. I discuss these in more depth in my new book, Speak With Impact: How to Command the Room and Influence Others:Public speaking is a skill, not a talent. You don’t have to be born with it; I truly believe that each one of us can be a powerful public speaker with practice and feedback. The more you use this skill and the more you focus on making progress, the better you become. Read books on the subject, join a Toastmasters club to build those skills, or recommend your organization bring in a public speaking expert to design a communication training program.Public speaking is something we do every single day. From phone calls to webinars, presentations to meetings to town halls, we have daily opportunities to speak in public. It can happen anywhere in the world, at every stage in our career, no matter our background. Each day, look at your calendar and determine where you want to have an impact in your communication. Prepare a few points in advance of each meeting to help you speak concisely and thoughtfully. Practice out loud a few times to make sure your words are genuine and conversational.We all get nervous. If you feel nervous before a presentation, remember that you are not alone. The fear of public speaking is universal, and most people will sympathize with you. Most of the time, everyone in the audience wants you to do well. Take the time to breathe deeply before your presentation and remind yourself why you truly care about your subject. Remind yourself of the impact of your words on others; that will center you and fill you with purpose.It’s about being authentic, not perfect. Nobody wants to hear a perfect speech or presentation; they want to feel that the speaker is authentic and genuinely cares about their subject. Forget the need to be perfect and you’ll reduce a lot of your stress. This is not an excuse to just wing it – you still need to prepare and practice – but don’t get caught up in endless revisions of a speech. If you know your subject and care about your audience, you will inspire your audience.It’s about connecting with your audience and building trust. Giving a speech or presentation is an opportunity to build a relationship of trust with your audience, whether it’s one person or a thousand people. By making eye contact with your audience and taking the time to engage with them instead of just talking atthem, your message will connect with them on a personal level and you will create more buy-in around your ideas.It’s about exercising leadership with your voice. Every time you speak, your words have an impact on others. Recognize the incredible power of the spoken word to change the way people think, feel, or act, and be intentional about how you plan to responsiblyuse that power. It’s not just about giving the speech and going home; it’s about using your words to mobilize others to take action, whether it’s forming a new employee network in your organization or recommending a new strategic course for your company. Take action based on your words.Next time you’re preparing to speak -- at a board meeting, a community function, even in a small group of a few peers -- think back to these truths. They’ll remind you of the little things that can get lost in a flurry of public speaking anxiety. They’ll help you become a better communicator and have a powerful and positive impact on the world around you. Allison Shapira is author ofSpeak With Impact: How to Command the Room and Influence Others. CEO and founder Global Public Speaking, LLC, Allison was trained as an opera singer and teaches public speaking at the Harvard Kennedy School. […]

  • How Pragmatic Leaders Can Transform Stuck Organizations
    by noreply@blogger.com (Dan McCarthy) on November 29, 2018 at 4:40 pm

    Guest post by Samuel B. Bacharach:A stuck organization is one that might meet conventional measures of success but it is not necessarily thriving. It cannot quite reach that next level of innovation. It just misses the big breakthrough or is too focused on old business models that it cannot make the leap forward.There are two primary reasons why organizations get stuck. They sink into inertia because of their clunky tendencies—often with multiple business models, competing goals, and conflicting priorities. There is so much going on that these organizations have a difficult time setting a path and moving forward in a coherent, organized fashion. Or they become stuck because of their narrow vision, limited scope, and a belief that yesterday’s business models are well suited to meet tomorrow’s challenges.The leadership challenge for pragmatic leaders is to transform organizations with clunky or myopic tendencies into truly thriving organizations that meet their potential. Pragmatic leaders have the capacity to engage in robust discovery and focused delivery. Robust discovery is to uncover the great ideas that are percolating in the organization and beyond. Pragmatic leaders have to be explorers. They have to be aware of their environment and look for signals. They have to have to confidence to seek out partners—both internal and external to the organization—to engage in deeper exploration. Pragmatic leaders have to be innovators. They have to lead the ideation process and support the decision to follow one idea to prototype. Focused delivery is to campaign for support for the idea and to sustain momentum. Once an idea has been fleshed out, it is time to share it with others in the organizations. Often, the default reaction is resistance. Pragmatic leaders anticipate the reactions that others may have, and try to develop arguments and justifications for their idea. Pragmatic leaders understand that they cannot drop the ball. Once an idea is off the ground, it cannot be forgotten or passed off to other parties. Pragmatic leaders have a vested interest in the development of their ideas, and are determined to see them to fruition.In the final analysis, pragmatic leadership is about execution. Pragmatic leaders understand that the difference between failed or failing organizations and thriving organizations is the ability of leaders to move ideas, overcome resistance, and create lasting change. To do this, they need to develop the micro-skills of discovery and delivery not only to move agendas and create change—but also to make sure that their organization doesn’t get stuck.Samuel B. Bacharach is the McKelvey-Grant Professor at Cornell University’s ILR School and the co-founder of the Bacharach Leadership Group. He is the author of Transforming the Clunky Organization: Pragmatic Leadership Skills to Break Inertia (2018) and The Agenda Mover: When Your Good Idea Is Not Enough (2016), both published by Cornell University Press. Bacharach trains high-potential leaders in the skills of political competence and agenda moving. More information about his writing is available at: samuelbacharach.com. […]

  • The Future Is Where Brands Must Focus
    by noreply@blogger.com (Dan McCarthy) on November 27, 2018 at 1:00 pm

    Guest post from Sean Pillot de Chenecey:Brands are built on trust, but in a post-truth world, they have a serious problem when so much of modern life is now defined by mistrust.A weakening of the vital trust connection between brands and consumers is causing enormous problems for businesses. The ramifications for brands in sectors of all description are deeply serious, when ‘reputation capital’ is of such immense importance, where the difference between Brand A and Brand B (and indeed Brand C, D, and E) so often comes down to our belief in those core questions of ‘are they honest, competent and reliable?’ Because if a brand isn’t trustworthy, it’ll be rejected in favour of one that is. And the actions that these brands take to demonstrate their credibility must clearly illustrate a blend of corporate ethics and brand authenticity. But a problem that’s becoming ever more visible is that some organisations have made authenticity their marketing strategy, rather than a business one. As a result, they come across as manufactured i.e. the very opposite of authentic.  Because just running an advertising campaign stating that a brand is trustworthy isn’t good enough. This isn’t a marketing issue, this is a business-wide issue, involving every facet of the organisation. Companies have to be consistent in their behaviour, from top to bottom, and right along the supply chain, from the ‘first hand of production to the final hand of the consumer’. And this genuinely has to go all the way. Therefore, it includes issues such as the ethical sourcing of ingredients, to environmentally sound production methodologies, to paying a decent living wage to production line workers, to adhering to animal-welfare, to pricing in a transparent manner, to communicating totally honest claims, etc. Make no mistake, organisations and brands that want to earn and keep our trust have to ‘live it like they say it’. Because business has to be about more than just profit. People, Planet, and to quote a much-derided word ‘Purpose’ have to be in there too.This approach very much links to social innovation and indeed conspicuous altruism. ‘Social Purpose’ is a phrase used obsessively by modern, forward-thinking leaders, and links directly to joint value creation where both shareholders and society benefit from business.And the ‘actual’ difference between ethical brands with a moral code and those exposed as being without one, is increasingly a key factor in consumer brand adoption or rejection.Yet many still attempt to portray, or indeed dismiss, the demographic most associated with this ideal as being one where, as The Guardian newspaper put it recently “the idea that market activity should have a purpose other than purely profit is roughly where it always was on the spectrum, somewhere between Marx and Jesus – one for the rioters, the subversives, the people with beards, unsuited to mainstream discourse.” To illustrate that this thinking goes right to the top of hard-headed business thinking, in their ‘Reflections from Davos’ report regarding the 2018 meeting of the World Economic Forum, the managing partner of McKinsey was quoted as saying “the next innovation imperative will be social innovation – business’s role will be critical here.” The report went on to note “society is demanding that companies, both public and private, serve a social purpose”.  This is set against research from those such as Deloitte who show how millennials are fast losing faith in business; and against a backdrop where people are scrambling to find solid ground in an era when we’re told that the very notion of truth is subjective, and indeed much of public discourse has become increasingly anti-fact and anti-expert. Fortunately there are numerous shining examples of organisations that are showing us all ‘how to do it better’ ranging across the business spectrum, in sectors ranging from beauty to finance, and from fashion to beverages.With good leadership at the core of these businesses, every member of the organisation are enabled to understand and demonstrate ‘why they do it, what they do and how they do it’. The end result, from a customer point of view, is that these brands are then seen by the consumer as being on their side, standing with them and matching their own values in an inspirational manner. Because in a post-truth era, we want, and need, to believe in something. And increasingly, brands that really do ‘live it like they say it’ are some of the few things on which we can actually believe and rely.  However, I firmly believe that whilst ‘reputation capital’ is an absolutely vital foundation of successful and enduring brands, this purely tells us about their past actions. The future is where brands must focus. And this means leaders of companies taking deliberate and definitive action to ensure that their businesses demonstrate ‘corporate social leadership’. Along with making reputable products, providing employment and returning dividends to shareholders; corporations can and should endeavour to make the world a better place, contributing to and engaging with society. This will also enable the truism that ‘good business is good business’.To act as a reference guide for the leaders of ‘good businesses’ in my book I’ve collated the key learnings into a ‘Post-Truth Brand Manifesto’. Here is a very brief summary of it…The Post-Truth Brand ManifestoBe authenticAuthenticity has been one of the core tenets of successful businesses since the idea of branding first began. But truly authentic companies that want to earn and keep our trust have to ‘live it like they say it’. Thus the organisation dovetails their brand intentions with the consumer and employee reality. Be transparentFor brands to thrive, business leaders need to find a way to regain and retain the confidence of employees. This starts with transparency. This is a business-wide issue, involving every facet of the organisation. Respect privacyIt’s hard to overstate the seriousness of this subject, and the levels of antipathy engendered towards businesses that are seen to be profiting from ‘surveillance capitalism’.Demonstrate empathy More and more people want to find ‘meaning and purpose’ in their working lives, and who are attracted to culturally aware, ‘good neighbour’ companies that reflect their viewpoints as ‘social citizens’. Be trustworthyIt’s no coincidence when companies which are trusted most tend to be legacy brands which have clearly demonstrated their ‘good business’ and/or ‘reliable product’ credentials, or indeed are those with transparency built-in to the core of their business model.Sean Pillot de Chenecey, author of The Post-Truth Business: How to Rebuild Brand Authenticity in a Distrusting World, has over 20 years’ experience as a brand expert, combining marketing consultancy with ethnographic activity and trend research around the world. His clients have included Unilever, Swatch, Heineken, Diageo, General Motors, Beiersdorf, AXA, Costa, Vodafone, Kerrygold and Starwood. He's collaborated with numerous international advertising, branding, design, media and PR agencies. He is a lecturer at the University of the Arts London, and has written for Dazed, Admap, Brand Strategy, Marketing and Contagious. A public speaker, he's given speeches for over a decade in Asia, Europe, Africa, the Middle East and North America. For more information, please visit www.koganpage.com/post-truth-business. […]

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